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Faithcast

Faithcast is the weekly podcast from catholicnews.ie, the news source for the Irish Catholic Bishops' Conference.

Presented by Brenda Drumm, Faithcast is a mixture of interviews and news from the Catholic Church in Ireland.

Faithcast

February 27, 2020
74: Faithcast Episode 74 - 27 February 2020
Faithcast is the weekly faith podcast from www.catholicnews.ie, the news source for the Irish Catholic Bishops’ Conference.

Presented by Brenda Drumm, Faithcast is a mixture of interviews, news and stories of faith from the Catholic Church in Ireland.

Episode 74 of Faithcast features an interview with Archbishop Eamon Martin, Archbishop of Armagh, Primate of All Ireland and Administrator of the Diocese of Dromore. Archbishop Martin speaks to Faithcast about the newly launched #LivingLent social media initiative and about this year's Day of Prayer for Survivors and Victims of Abuse. 
 
The faith news this week features:
- the publication by Veritas of Meeting on the Protection of Minors in the Church: Responsibility, Accountability and Transparency, which includes the keynotes addresses from the meeting, the testimonies of survivors of abuse as well as the widely discussed concluding speech of Pope Francis who was present throughout the four-day meeting which took place from 21 to 24 February 2019
- Pope Francis' homily for Ash Wednesday
- The launch of the annual Trocaire Lenten Campaign
- Pope Francis' comments on those affected by coronavirus
 
You can get this podcast directly to your phone by subscribing to the RSS feed or to the iTunes link here.

For more on these stories please see www.catholicnews.ie.

All queries relating to the podcast should be directed to bdrumm@catholicbishops.ie.
February 20, 2020
73: Faithcast - episode 73
Faithcast is the weekly faith podcast from www.catholicnews.ie, the news source for the Irish Catholic Bishops’ Conference.

Presented by Brenda Drumm, Faithcast is a mixture of interviews, news and stories of faith from the Catholic Church in Ireland.

Episode 73 of Faithcast features an interview with Gerard Gallagher, a Pastoral Worker in the Archdiocese of Dublin, about his new book for Lent 2020 called Return to Me With All Your Heart. 
 
The faith news this week features: Bookings for the IEC2020 in Budapest; Archbishop Michel Neary launches book of reflections by Bishop Martin Drennan; the annual Day of Prayer for survivors and victims of abuse; a new children’s book from Pope Francis; and, Trócaire’s Lenten campaign for 2020. 
 
You can get this podcast directly to your phone by subscribing to the RSS feed or to the iTunes link here.

For more on these stories please see www.catholicnews.ie.

All queries relating to the podcast should be directed to bdrumm@catholicbishops.ie.
February 13, 2020
72: Faithcast - episode 72
Faithcast is the weekly faith podcast from www.catholicnews.ie, the news source for the Irish Catholic Bishops’ Conference.

Presented by Brenda Drumm, Faithcast is a mixture of interviews, news and stories of faith from the Catholic Church in Ireland.

Episode 72 of Faithcast features an interview with Bishop Denis Nulty, President of Accord Catholic Marriage Care Service CLG, in which he speaks about the blessing of engaged couple Michelle and Jonathan at the Shrine of Saint Valentine in Whitefriar Street Church in Dublin. Bishop Nulty also speaks about the release of statistics on Accord's Marriage Preparation and Counselling Services and suggests that it might now be timely for there to be a Minister with special responsibility for Family and for the Elderly in the new Government. 
 
The faith news this week features the publication of Querida Amazonia (Beloved Amazon), the Apostolic Exhortation of Pope Francis; details of the official Irish pilgrimage to IEC2020 in Budapest; the Day of Prayer for Survivors and Victims of Sexual Abuse on Friday 28 February; and, the awarding of the Services to Charity Award to Trócaire CEO Caoimhe de Barra. 
 
You can get this podcast directly to your phone by subscribing to the RSS feed or to the iTunes link here.

For more on these stories please see www.catholicnews.ie.

All queries relating to the podcast should be directed to bdrumm@catholicbishops.ie.
January 30, 2020
71: Faithcast - episode 71
Faithcast is the weekly faith podcast from www.catholicnews.ie, the news source for the Irish Catholic Bishops’ Conference.

Presented by Brenda Drumm, Faithcast is a mixture of interviews, news and stories of faith from the Catholic Church in Ireland.

Episode 71 of Faithcast features an interview with Father Neil Xavier O’Donoghue, Lecturer in Systematic Theology at Saint Patrick’s College Maynooth, on his new podcast to get you to listen to and reflect on the entire Catechism of the Catholic Church in a year! 
 
The faith news this week features: the appointment of Father Paul Dempsey as the new Bishop of Achonry; Archbishop Eamons Martin’s tribute to Seamus Mallon RIP; Bishop Denis Nulty leads a delegation to the first ever Vatican Conference on the pastoral care of the elderly; Bishop Alan McGuckian’s statement as chair of the Bishops’ Council for Justice and Peace on Election 2020; and Pope Francis’ Message for World Communications Day 2020 to focus on storytelling. 
 
You can get this podcast directly to your phone by subscribing to the RSS feed or to the iTunes link here.

For more on these stories please see www.catholicnews.ie.

All queries relating to the podcast should be directed to bdrumm@catholicbishops.ie.

Come and See Inspirations

Come & See Inspirations is a podcasting team based out of Ardagh in West Limerick, Ireland.

Our podcasts are based around the weekly radio programme SacredSpace102fm, and includes our weekly radio programmes, as well as other recordings and inspirational talks.

Come & See Inspirations

April 11, 2021
C&SI - Mass - Divine Mercy Sunday - 11 April 2021 - Abbeyfeale

Mass today from the Church of the Assumption, Abbeyfeale, Co. limerick for the Divine Mercy  Sunday is celebrated by Fr Brendan Duggan

April 10, 2021
Divine Mercy Sunday - 11 April 2021 (S11E21b) (SS102fm programme excerpt)

This weeks programme dips back into the archive to an interview first broadcast on 3 April 2016. John and Michael have an interview with Don Devaney who share their thoughts and reflections about Divine Mercy Sunday. Pope John Paul II introduced Divine Mercy Sunday following on the private revelation to the Polish nun St Faustina. Many Catholics gather in churches throughout the world today at 3pm to partake in the Divine Mercy Chaplet, veneration of the image of Divine Mercy, confessions, Mass etc.

The Feast of Divine Mercy, celebrated on the Octave of Easter (the Sunday after Easter Sunday), is a relatively new addition to the Roman Catholic liturgical calendar. Celebrating the Divine Mercy of Jesus Christ, as revealed  to St Maria Faustina Kowalska, this feast was extended to the entire Catholic Church by Pope John Paul II on April 30, 2000, the day that he canonized Saint Faustina.

From EWTN:

From the diary of a young Polish nun, a special devotion began spreading throughout the world in the 1930s. The message is nothing new, but is a reminder of what the Church has always taught through scripture and tradition: that God is merciful and forgiving and that we, too, must show mercy and forgiveness. But in the Divine Mercy devotion, the message takes on a powerful new focus, calling people to a deeper understanding that God’s love is unlimited and available to everyone — especially the greatest sinners. 

The message and devotion to Jesus as The Divine Mercy is based on the writings of Saint Faustina Kowalska, an uneducated Polish nun who, in obedience to her spiritual director, wrote a diary of about 600 pages recording the revelations she received about God’s mercy. Even before her death in 1938, the devotion to The Divine Mercy had begun to spread.
The message of mercy is that God loves us — all of us — no matter how great our sins. He wants us to recognize that His mercy is greater than our sins, so that we will call upon Him with trust, receive His mercy, and let it flow through us to others. During the course of Jesus' revelations to Saint Faustina on the Divine Mercy He asked on numerous occasions that a feast day be dedicated to the Divine Mercy and that this feast be celebrated on the Sunday after Easter. The liturgical texts of that day, the 2nd Sunday of Easter, concern the institution of the Sacrament of Penance, the Tribunal of the Divine Mercy, and are thus already suited to the request of Our Lord. This Feast, which had already been granted to the nation of Poland and been celebrated within Vatican City, was granted to the Universal Church by Pope John Paul II on the occasion of the canonization of Sr. Faustina on 30 April 2000. In a decree dated 23 May 2000, the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments stated that "throughout the world the Second Sunday of Easter will receive the name Divine Mercy Sunday, a perennial invitation to the Christian world to face, with confidence in divine benevolence, the difficulties and trials that mankind will experience in the years to come." These papal acts represent the highest endorsement that the Church can give to a private revelation, an act of papal infallibility proclaiming the certain sanctity of the mystic, and the granting of a universal feast, as requested by Our Lord to St. Faustina.
April 10, 2021
SacredSpace102fm - Divine Mercy Sunday - 11 April 2021 (S11E21)

Christus Resurrexit, alleluia!
Resurrexit vere, alleluia
Surrexit Dominus vere, alleluia!
Et apparuit Simoni, alleluia!

Christ is risen, Alleluia!
He is truly risen, Alleluia
The Lord is risen indeed, Alleluia!
And has appeared to Simon, alleluia!

Welcome to Sacred Space 102fm on the second Sunday of Easter where we continue to celebrate Easter Sunday within the Octave of Easter. On this weeks programme we have our saints of the week and our reflection on the Sunday gospel. As today of course is also Divine Mercy Sunday we have dipped back into the archive to an interview originally broadcast on 3 April 2016 where John and Michael Keating have an interview with Don Devaney about Divine Mercy and the Divine Mercy devotion.

April 4, 2021
C&SI - Easter Sunday Mass - Abbeyfeale 4 April 2021

Mass today from the Church of the Assumption, Abbeyfeale, Co. limerick for the Easter Sunday is celebrated by Fr Tony Mullins

April 3, 2021
SacredSpace102fm - Jesus is Risen ! - Easter Sunday - 4 April 2021 (S11E20)

Christus Resurrexit! Allelulia!!
Christ is Risen! Allelulia!!

On this Easter Sunday from all the Come & See Inspirations team we wish you and yours every blessing of this glorious day! Christ has risen! Alleluia, Alleluia!!

And so to share the joy of this special Sunday, we are joined by an old friend of the programme - Noirin Lynch - to pause and reflect on what it means for us in this Covid-19 time.

In addition we have some notices and of course our reflection on the Gospel of the Resurrection. There is no saints of the week this week as we enter into the Easter Octave - from Easter Sunday to the following Sunday we liturgically stop time to focus on the specialness of what we are celebrating and to liturgically extend the celebration out as much as we can.

Jesus is Risen - Noirin Lynch

Resurrection then, what is it?

Is it a denial of reality, a promise of no suffering - No

Is it an optimism, an insistence on looking on the bright side - No

Resurrection – Easter – is a protest against despair.

It is a realistic, looking life straight in the face, acknowledgement that some things are more important than death. 

Some things are more important than despair. Some things are more powerful than realism and fatalism and pandemics and nostalgia. 

The women who arrived at that tomb were not thrilled, happy, laughing or anything like it. Scripture says they were alarmed.  As they entered the tomb, they saw a young man dressed in a white robe sitting on the right side, and they were alarmed.

They went in and found a messenger who did not assuage that alarm. He told them what had happened and it left them trembling and bewildered. Silenced even, afraid to speak of the impossible to others cause they could not make sense of it themselves

 I find that hugely comforting this year. I would love to be thrilled and excited about Easter but a part of me is just tired. Pandemics will do that to you. I am optimistic, but also a little scared of getting too excited in case there is a set back. I am happy but afraid it might rain. Lol. I am human. 

I find it hugely encouraging this year that our Gospel speaks of a dutiful group of women, who stayed faithful, who were bewildered and blest

From these women, the church began. From this honest reaction, Jesus the Christ became known to us all. From humanity not perfection, we go on out into Galilee 

Sometimes we dance through the rituals of Holy Week – busy in preparations and lists. This year we are forced into being present without the dance of busyness.

We are forced into Easter not in our Sunday best but in tracksuits and with trembling.  

Easter is not about how well prepared and put together we are 

-          Things are broken here and yet there is grace enough for everyone

Easter is not about surety and freedom from suffering

-          Some part of us dies each year as we come to know Gods love, it hurts but it heals too

Easter IS bewildering. If its not, we have underestimated its importance. 

-          Christ has broken a prison that held us all captured, the idea that death was the last and final thing we could not overcome. 

Pandemic is not the last word.  Life is not ended but changed.  Hope wins

Easter is a protest against despair

Let us know from now on that we are not defined by the worst of times, the loneliest of moments, the bewilderment. All of this was present at Resurrection and God transformed and blessed it. And God blessed you and I just as we are now. 

God is. 

God lives

God carries us on into Galilee. 

Alleluia

April 3, 2021
Jesus is Risen - Easter Reflection with Noirin Lynch - 4 April 2021 (S11E20b) (SS102fm programme excerpt)

Jesus is Risen - Noirin Lynch

Resurrection then, what is it?

Is it a denial of reality, a promise of no suffering - No

Is it an optimism, an insistence on looking on the bright side - No

Resurrection – Easter – is a protest against despair.

It is a realistic, looking life straight in the face, acknowledgement that some things are more important than death. 

Some things are more important than despair. Some things are more powerful than realism and fatalism and pandemics and nostalgia. 

The women who arrived at that tomb were not thrilled, happy, laughing or anything like it. Scripture says they were alarmed.  As they entered the tomb, they saw a young man dressed in a white robe sitting on the right side, and they were alarmed.

They went in and found a messenger who did not assuage that alarm. He told them what had happened and it left them trembling and bewildered. Silenced even, afraid to speak of the impossible to others cause they could not make sense of it themselves

 I find that hugely comforting this year. I would love to be thrilled and excited about Easter but a part of me is just tired. Pandemics will do that to you. I am optimistic, but also a little scared of getting too excited in case there is a set back. I am happy but afraid it might rain. Lol. I am human. 

I find it hugely encouraging this year that our Gospel speaks of a dutiful group of women, who stayed faithful, who were bewildered and blest

From these women, the church began. From this honest reaction, Jesus the Christ became known to us all. From humanity not perfection, we go on out into Galilee 

Sometimes we dance through the rituals of Holy Week – busy in preparations and lists. This year we are forced into being present without the dance of busyness.

We are forced into Easter not in our Sunday best but in tracksuits and with trembling.  

Easter is not about how well prepared and put together we are 

-          Things are broken here and yet there is grace enough for everyone

Easter is not about surety and freedom from suffering

-          Some part of us dies each year as we come to know Gods love, it hurts but it heals too

Easter IS bewildering. If its not, we have underestimated its importance. 

-          Christ has broken a prison that held us all captured, the idea that death was the last and final thing we could not overcome. 

Pandemic is not the last word.  Life is not ended but changed.  Hope wins

Easter is a protest against despair

Let us know from now on that we are not defined by the worst of times, the loneliest of moments, the bewilderment. All of this was present at Resurrection and God transformed and blessed it. And God blessed you and I just as we are now. 

God is. 

God lives

God carries us on into Galilee. 

Alleluia